Not exactly the Stade des Alpes

January 1, 2011 - Uncategorized / Wales

I could, like everyone else in the “blogosphere”, do a post about my new year’s resolutions. But instead I’m going to talk about Aberystwyth Town FC, who I went to see this afternoon almost by accident (saw some people with scarves on, followed them to the ground, bought a ticket).

The match was Aber Town vs. Haverfordwest County, kick off 2.30. Whilst Aber are in the Welsh Premiership, it did feel a little like non-league football to me. The ground reminded me most of Throstle Nest (home of Farsley Celtic), with portakabins, old fashioned stands, and grassy knolls. I’ve never been to a match where home and away supporters are completely unsegregated before – even when we went to Farsley v. Cambridge the yellow & blacks were kept apart from us Farsley ruffians. But at Aber everyone was free to stroll about the ground.

One of the things I like about football in small grounds like this is that you can hear the players, and they can hear the crowd. It can make the game a little more interesting – I didn’t shout at anyone, of course, but one of the linesmen was getting quite wound up by the comments from the stands. There wasn’t any chanting, which is a shame. I love a good footy chant.

The dugouts were rather rudimentary (see picture below). There was a second one of these, labelled “AWAY”. As you’d expect.

Despite the 2-nil defeat, the cold, and the lack of chanting, I enjoyed the match a lot. My current plan even involves trying to catch the Aberystwyth Town Ladies match at the end of January.

Comments

  1. Dan says:

    When I lived in Lancaster I really got into going to see the local club play. The fact that it’s a town with it’s own identity made it far more of a community based experience than seeing Farsley or Spartans (the nearest non-league club to me now).

    At Lancaster there is quite a bit of chanting. Winding the opposition players or referees up was quite merciless. As soon as somebody showed signs of annoyance at comments the crowd were making that was a sign to start singing about them.

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